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What Does Cameron Echols-Luper's Switch to CB Mean for TCU's Secondary?

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The wide receiver and return man will try his hand in the secondary in 2015.

Kevin Jairaj-USA TODAY Sports

It's been known for a few weeks now that TCU wide receiver and return man Cameron Echols-Luper is making the switch to cornerback. The move makes sense, because despite being a talented receiver, depth kept him from seeing consistent time on the field. In fact, eleven TCU players finished with more receptions than Echols-Luper in 2014.

However, moving to cornerback could unleash his potential.

With Kevin White graduating, TCU is losing its No.1 cornerback for the second consecutive year, and while Ranthony Texada is one known commodity at corner there are quite a few question marks behind him.

Here's a quick look at the depth TCU has at cornerback entering spring (note: their class is current, not what it will be in August).

No.

Name

Height

Weight

Class

2

Corry O’Meally

6-0

170

JR

11

Ranthony Texada

5-10

170

RS FR

15

Cameron Echols-Luper

6-0

190

SO

16

Torrance Mosley

5-10

160

FR

18

Nick Orr

5-10

166

FR

19

Cyd Calvin

6-1

175

RS FR

27

Travoskey Garrett

6-1

190

JR

33

Robert Lewis

5-11

165

JR

N/A

Deshawn Raymond

6-1

180

FR

Not included on this list are current commits Julius Lewis and Jeff Gladney, who have not signed with the Frogs. Raymond, also a member of the 2015 class, signed and enrolled early, and has been on campus and in meetings since the start of the spring semester.

So, of the guys listed, only three have really seen recent playing time at corner, Texada, O'Meally, and Orr, and really, the only one who has a starting spot locked down at this point is Texada, meaning the door is open for Echols-Luper (or Deshawn Raymond) to step in and snag that second starting spot. Luper's height and speed (he's an All-American track guy, clocked at a 4.41-40 coming out of high school), both will help him make the transition, and with defensive coaches like the ones TCU has, it wouldn't be surprising to see him be a major contributor on that side of the ball pretty quickly.

Looking at the larger picture, the secondary is trying to replace leadership, as well as experience. Echols-Luper has been a vocal member of this team since stepping foot on campus, and he could be a locker-room replacement for the likes of Sam Carter and Chris Hackett, as he enters his junior year.

We'll obviously know more once we reach spring ball, but for now, it's nice to know that a talented, game-experienced guy like Echols-Luper is adding depth to a position of need.